MDF MS 12-02-10

MDF report Feb 10 2012

 

Macalister Demonstration Farm Update 286 (Week ending Feb 10, 2011)

 

The Macalister Demonstration Farm is milking 289 cows grazing 71 hectares, a stocking rate of 4.1 cows per hectare.  Last year at this time, there were 285 milkers, and the stocking rate was 4.0 cows per hectare.  The daily allocation for last week was one 30th of the grazing area, and the actual grazing rest time was 30 days. 

 

Compared to last week, milk production per cow is up from 1.77 to 1.81 kg milk solids (MS) per cow per day.  Litres per cow per day are up from 25.0 to 25.1.  Milk fat test has risen from 3.67% to 3.71% (fat yield is up from 0.92 to 0.93 kg per cow per day).  The protein test is up from 3.42% to 3.49% (protein yield is up from 0.86 to 0.88 kg per cow per day).  This time last year, milk production was 21.5 litres, 1.63 kg MS, 0.89 kg fat, and 0.75 kg protein per cow per day.  It is estimated that the cows are each gaining 0.1 kg live weight per day.  

 

The daily pasture consumption from the grazing area is up from 36 to 37 kg dry matter (DM) per hectare per day.  The pasture consumption per cow is up from 8.9 kg to 9.0 DM per cow per day.  This time last year, pasture consumption was 39 kg DM per hectare per day, and 9.8 kg DM per cow per day. 

 

4.0 mm of irrigation water, 1.2 kg of nitrogen element, no phosphorus, 0.05 kg of potassium, $0.19 of pasture renovation, and $0.30 of topping, all per hectare per day, have contributed to the current pasture consumption.  The daily spend on these pasture inputs totals $4.76 per hectare per day, up from $4.56.  Based on those cash inputs only, the consumed pasture price is estimated to be $130 per tonne of dry matter, down from $132.     

 

Supplementary feed includes crushed wheat, and a pellet containing 25% protein, minerals, Rumensin, Tylan, and Zinc Oxide, totalling 7.6 kg DM per cow per day, at an average price of $329 per DM tonne, and 0.5 kg DM of Palm Kernal. 

 

The Bulk Milk Cell Count has fallen from 117,000 to 99,000.  This time last year the BMCC was 111,000.   

 

The milk price (less compulsory levies) that the MDF anticipates receiving for the week’s milk is $5.35 per kg milk solids, or 38.5 cents per litre.  Milk income per cow per day is up from $9.27 to $9.66, made up of $3.08 for the fat, $7.24 for the protein, and minus 0.66 for the litres.  This time last year milk income per cow per day was $8.80. 

 

Feed cost per cow per day (including pasture and supplements) are the same at $3.81 per cow per day, leaving a Margin over All Feed (MOAF) per cow of $5.85, up from $5.46.  The margin over all feed per hectare is $23.82.  The whole farm feed margin is $1,691, up from $1,578 per day.  This time last year the whole farm feed margin was $1,585 per day.    

 

The MDF has chosen the “traditional” system of milk payment. However, the other systems are always being examined to see if they might return a higher margin.  Now that milk production from September to January is fixed, any farm that has selected the Domestic Incentive (DI) payment system knows how much milk is required, in the next five months, to meet the various levels of DI payment. A judgement and effort can be made to target a level.  Leaving the chase too late may mean that milk per cow falls irretrievably, making targets impossible to achieve.  Some farmers, who have chosen DI, have made their DI target more difficult by producing very well in the recent five months. 

 

The DI milk price jumps up in stages:  above 40% milk in the DI period gains about an extra 1 cent per litre; 41% about 2.3 cents; 42% about 3.5 cents; and 43% about 5 cents extra.  5 cents extra seems very attractive! By only just making into the next stage gets that price rise.  If the next stage appears miles away, it may not be worth the chase. 

 

Feeding more supplements per cow is an option to get more milk per cow to reach a higher DI level.  Profitable feeding generally means supplying as much grass as possible, so for the next 5 months, fertiliser, irrigation and grazing management is crucial (isn’t it always?).   After the best efforts at grass supply, if the herd can eat more, without wasting too much grass, give it to them.

 

Another way to get more milk is to milk more cows. Buying cows for a short period is probably extreme, but carefully choosing each cow’s drying off date, in June, and possibly reducing each cow’s normal dry period, is a method that will hold cow numbers higher.

 

Another manipulation in June could be to suddenly shorten the grazing rotation.  This will supply more grass at the last minute.  There are some short term/long term issues here.  Reducing the cow’s dry period, and shortening the grazing rotation may mean lost milk or lost grass in July, mindful that July’s milk, and half of August’s, is in next season’s DI milk.

 

A DPI farm walk called “Recalibrating your electric fence post – using ETo for better irrigation decisions” will be held at the MDF today, Tuesday 14th February at 10am

 

Frank Tyndall      0409 940 782    ftyndall@ozemail.com.au

 

Macalister Demonstration Farm Update 286 (Week ending Feb 10, 2011)

The Macalister Demonstration Farm is milking 289 cows grazing 71 hectares, a stocking rate of 4.1 cows per hectare.  Last year at this time, there were 285 milkers, and the stocking rate was 4.0 cows per hectare.  The daily allocation for last week was one 30th of the grazing area, and the actual grazing rest time was 30 days. 

 

Compared to last week, milk production per cow is up from 1.77 to 1.81 kg milk solids (MS) per cow per day.  Litres per cow per day are up from 25.0 to 25.1.  Milk fat test has risen from 3.67% to 3.71% (fat yield is up from 0.92 to 0.93 kg per cow per day).  The protein test is up from 3.42% to 3.49% (protein yield is up from 0.86 to 0.88 kg per cow per day).  This time last year, milk production was 21.5 litres, 1.63 kg MS, 0.89 kg fat, and 0.75 kg protein per cow per day.  It is estimated that the cows are each gaining 0.1 kg live weight per day.  

 

The daily pasture consumption from the grazing area is up from 36 to 37 kg dry matter (DM) per hectare per day.  The pasture consumption per cow is up from 8.9 kg to 9.0 DM per cow per day.  This time last year, pasture consumption was 39 kg DM per hectare per day, and 9.8 kg DM per cow per day. 

 

4.0 mm of irrigation water, 1.2 kg of nitrogen element, no phosphorus, 0.05 kg of potassium, $0.19 of pasture renovation, and $0.30 of topping, all per hectare per day, have contributed to the current pasture consumption.  The daily spend on these pasture inputs totals $4.76 per hectare per day, up from $4.56.  Based on those cash inputs only, the consumed pasture price is estimated to be $130 per tonne of dry matter, down from $132.      

 

Supplementary feed includes crushed wheat, and a pellet containing 25% protein, minerals, Rumensin, Tylan, and Zinc Oxide, totalling 7.6 kg DM per cow per day, at an average price of $329 per DM tonne, and 0.5 kg DM of Palm Kernal. 

 

The Bulk Milk Cell Count has fallen from 117,000 to 99,000.  This time last year the BMCC was 111,000.   

 

The milk price (less compulsory levies) that the MDF anticipates receiving for the week’s milk is $5.35 per kg milk solids, or 38.5 cents per litre.  Milk income per cow per day is up from $9.27 to $9.66, made up of $3.08 for the fat, $7.24 for the protein, and minus 0.66 for the litres.  This time last year milk income per cow per day was $8.80. 

 

Feed cost per cow per day (including pasture and supplements) are the same at $3.81 per cow per day, leaving a Margin over All Feed (MOAF) per cow of $5.85, up from $5.46.  The margin over all feed per hectare is $23.82.  The whole farm feed margin is $1,691, up from $1,578 per day.  This time last year the whole farm feed margin was $1,585 per day.   

 

The MDF has chosen the “traditional” system of milk payment. However, the other systems are always being examined to see if they might return a higher margin.  Now that milk production from September to January is fixed, any farm that has selected the Domestic Incentive (DI) payment system knows how much milk is required, in the next five months, to meet the various levels of DI payment. A judgement and effort can be made to target a level.  Leaving the chase too late may mean that milk per cow falls irretrievably, making targets impossible to achieve.  Some farmers, who have chosen DI, have made their DI target more difficult by producing very well in the recent five months. 

 

The DI milk price jumps up in stages:  above 40% milk in the DI period gains about an extra 1 cent per litre; 41% about 2.3 cents; 42% about 3.5 cents; and 43% about 5 cents extra.  5 cents extra seems very attractive! By only just making into the next stage gets that price rise.  If the next stage appears miles away, it may not be worth the chase. 

 

Feeding more supplements per cow is an option to get more milk per cow to reach a higher DI level.  Profitable feeding generally means supplying as much grass as possible, so for the next 5 months, fertiliser, irrigation and grazing management is crucial (isn’t it always?).   After the best efforts at grass supply, if the herd can eat more, without wasting too much grass, give it to them.

 

Another way to get more milk is to milk more cows. Buying cows for a short period is probably extreme, but carefully choosing each cow’s drying off date, in June, and possibly reducing each cow’s normal dry period, is a method that will hold cow numbers higher.

 

Another manipulation in June could be to suddenly shorten the grazing rotation.  This will supply more grass at the last minute.  There are some short term/long term issues here.  Reducing the cow’s dry period, and shortening the grazing rotation may mean lost milk or lost grass in July, mindful that July’s milk, and half of August’s, is in next season’s DI milk.

 

A DPI farm walk called “Recalibrating your electric fence post – using ETo for better irrigation decisions” will be held at the MDF today, Tuesday 14th February at 10am

 

Frank Tyndall      0409 940 782    ftyndall@ozemail.com.auw

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